Talos Update on M.E.Doc

http://blog.talosintelligence.com/2017/07/the-medoc-connection.html?m=1

Summary

The Nyetya attack was a destructive ransomware variant that affected many organizations inside of Ukraine and multinational corporations with operations in Ukraine. In cooperation with Cisco Advanced Services Incident Response, Talos identified several key aspects of the attack. The investigation found a supply chain-focused attack at M.E.Doc software that delivered a destructive payload disguised as ransomware. By utilizing stolen credentials, the actor was able to manipulate the update server for M.E.Doc to proxy connections to an actor-controlled server. Based on the findings, Talos remains confident that the attack was destructive in nature. The effects were broad reaching, with Ukraine Cyber police confirming over 2000 affected companies in Ukraine alone.
This is another good article and write up by Talos.
Gives a lot more useful insight as to how this happened, another good read, will be interesting to see how this continues to develop over the next few days and weeks.

View of someone who was impacted by Petya

http://colsec.blogspot.de/2017/06/petya-outbreak-june-27th.html

 

My machine –

Domain joined Windows 10 Enterprise 64bit running McAfee AV + Encrypted HDD. Fully patched with June’s updates and manually disabled/removed SMBv1.

Hit at 12:40 UK time with a BSoD. Reboot “Please install operating system – no boot device”.

 

And the follow up

http://colsec.blogspot.de/2017/06/petyaa-infection-summary-of-events.html

 

I’ll just put this up here to summarise what happened and how.

We assume 1 PC was infected, that machine provided the virus with some credentials. Could have been a workstation admin’s account, giving the virus admin rights to all PCs in the local area. Over time, it must have picked up Domain Admin rights as it spread, then hitting Domain Controllers and all other Windows servers with it’s PSEXEC/WMIC code. The rest is history. We lost PCs that were encrypted with McAfee Disk Encryption due to corrupted MBR, PCs that were not encrypted with McAfee showed the ransom message.

 

This is a good demonstration of making sure everything is 100% patched and not nearly patched.  It is difficult to keep older machines patched and updated in an enterprise environment, however when these systems are designed and implemented, we should be thinking and taking into consideration how we are going to update them and keep them secure, otherwise we will have to deal with the events described above, again and again.

UIWIX Ransomware

It was just a matter of time until other organisations or individuals followed the path set by WannaCry last weekend.

Seems there is another variant of ransomware doing the rounds which is exploiting the same loop hole as WannaCry is using port 445 to enumerate and infect other machines on your internal and then external networks.  It is exploiting the same SMB vulnerability (MS17-010).

Mitigation – Just need to  make sure you have the latest updates from microsoft.

If you see traffic to these domains, its likely not good!

aa1[.]super5566[.]com
07[.]super5566[.]com
a1[.]super5566[.]com
www[.]super5566[.]com
08[.]super5566[.]com

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/c72ba80934dc955fa3e4b0894a5330714dd72c2cd4f7ff6988560fc04d2e6494?environmentId=100

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/c72ba80934dc955fa3e4b0894a5330714dd72c2cd4f7ff6988560fc04d2e6494?environmentId=100

Infected Webpage

hxxp://petroffpianostudio[.]com/ (This may now be cleaned up at the time of posting)

It looks like the the aforementioned webpage is infected with a redirect to download suspect files

Traffic observed after the infection suggests that it will attempt to download executable files from a few different locations.

hxxp://talk-of-the-tyne.co.uk/download1264/
hxxp://willy.pro.br/download3299/
hxxp://freight.eu.com/download3696/

The analysis of the files on hybrid analysis does confirm that these are malicious files

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/e8d2f149de58eb45b398a84d6d27d568ab1d239584edcb55531fe11da2f9c51b?environmentId=100

Once the executable file is on the host machine, it then attempts to call out to the following

173.230.137.155
206.214.220.79

Upon further analysis we have another file which has been downloaded from the following location

hxxp://matchpointpro.com/lDu52756eeJMW/

https://www.virustotal.com/en/file/4b97fa91d9f33392fde84a2af3500a78621a71b80b3d3486a7b70cdd47187ce3/analysis/1492020556/

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/4b97fa91d9f33392fde84a2af3500a78621a71b80b3d3486a7b70cdd47187ce3?environmentId=100

I revisited the links later in the day and have a bit more details, we can see they are still serving executable files. Chrome is now blocking and suggesting these files are malicious, and also so is internet explorer. I have not tried them on firefox at this time.

GET /download3299/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/x-ms-application, image/jpeg, application/xaml+xml, image/gif, image/pjpeg, application/x-ms-xbap, */*
Accept-Language: en-gb
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: willy.pro.br
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:16:51 GMT
Content-Type: application/octet-stream
Connection: keep-alive
Keep-Alive: timeout=15
Server: Apache
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="6274.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary


GET /download1264/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/x-ms-application, image/jpeg, application/xaml+xml, image/gif, image/pjpeg, application/x-ms-xbap, */*
Accept-Language: en-GB
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: talk-of-the-tyne.co.uk
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:16:09 GMT
Server: Apache
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="5198.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary
Vary: User-Agent
X-Powered-By: PleskLin
MS-Author-Via: DAV
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=100
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Type: application/octet-stream


GET /lDu52756eeJMW/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: */*
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Host: matchpointpro.com
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: nginx
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:11:09 GMT
Content-Type: application/octet-stream
Connection: keep-alive
Keep-Alive: timeout=15
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="5345.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary
ngpass_ngall: 1

 

Still in the process of building my Analysis Lab, so this is not quite how I would like to post, but some information is better than none.

Decimal IP Campaign

Saw this article today and its quite interesting.

Websites compromised in ‘Decimal IP’ campaign

A quick search of the string “1760468715” shows there are quite a few websites that have been compromised.

This is quite a clever but old technique that is referred to as Dotless IP’s.  A google search will find quite a few results, with several posts from around 15 or so years ago.

In order to work out the IP address the value represents you can perform a fairly straight forward calculation.

If you had the IP address 172.16.4.8

You can calculate this as follows

172 * 16777216 = 2885681152
16 * 65536 = 1048576
4 * 256 = 1024
8 * 1 = 8

Add the bold figures up.

2886730760

So if you were to enter this address in your browser http://2886730760

It would attempt to take you to 172.16.4.8

Just another way of hiding in plain sight.