Boozallen Report on Petya

I came across this write up by boozallen yesterday, and found it had some very interesting thoughts and insight to how and what happened.

 

https://www.boozallen.com/content/dam/boozallen_site/sig/pdf/white-paper/telebots-group-and-petya.pdf

 

1. Four VirusTotal users uploaded the compiled VBS backdoors along with other malicious files, including the
TeleBots telegram-based backdoor, PowerShell post-exploitation scripts, Mimikatz, and other tools. For each
user, these uploads occurred within the same one- to two-day time period.
2. In most cases, these files were uploaded several months prior to the 27 June Petya incident.
3. Booz Allen Cyber4Sight also determined that in several cases, these submitters also uploaded files
associated with the MEDoc update utility to VirusTotal. This shows that these submitters were also likely
users of the MEDoc software, and the inclusion of these files with the files identified in number 1 (above)
demonstrates that MEDoc-related processes may have facilitated the installation vector for this software.

 

These past few months have been quite interesting.  The scale and ease of WannaCry and the more recent  Petya/Non Petya attacks, have created a greater awareness for individuals outside of the security world.  Major news outlets are interested in these events as they transpire and this can only be a good thing.  I still believe we are many years away from individuals and business truly changing their mindsets and realise that just reacting to these events is not enough, and more time and effort is spent on how these applications are designed and how we approach security.  We need to try harder to make applications and hardware secure by design and not rely on 3rd party products afterwards to make the product “secure”.

We are going to have several more large scale events like this until the mindset changes, humans are stubborn and we do not like to change – however this is something we must do.

 

 

Talos Update on M.E.Doc

http://blog.talosintelligence.com/2017/07/the-medoc-connection.html?m=1

Summary

The Nyetya attack was a destructive ransomware variant that affected many organizations inside of Ukraine and multinational corporations with operations in Ukraine. In cooperation with Cisco Advanced Services Incident Response, Talos identified several key aspects of the attack. The investigation found a supply chain-focused attack at M.E.Doc software that delivered a destructive payload disguised as ransomware. By utilizing stolen credentials, the actor was able to manipulate the update server for M.E.Doc to proxy connections to an actor-controlled server. Based on the findings, Talos remains confident that the attack was destructive in nature. The effects were broad reaching, with Ukraine Cyber police confirming over 2000 affected companies in Ukraine alone.
This is another good article and write up by Talos.
Gives a lot more useful insight as to how this happened, another good read, will be interesting to see how this continues to develop over the next few days and weeks.

Backdoor in M.E.Doc Application

I came across an interesting article today, with regards to the Petya / NotPetya cyber attack from last week.  This is a very good write up and analysis of how the organisation M.E.Doc appears to have been compromised and used to spread the malware in a series of updates for the software it produces.

This demonstrates how devastating these types of compromises can be and as a defender can make it very difficult to identify and stop this type of attack from happening, if you happen to be the target of said attack.

I suggest you read this very good article!

 

https://www.welivesecurity.com/2017/07/04/analysis-of-telebots-cunning-backdoor/

Analysis of TeleBots’ cunning backdoor

On the 27th of June 2017, a new cyberattack hit many computer systems in Ukraine, as well as in other countries. That attack was spearheaded by the malware ESET products detect as Diskcoder.C(aka ExPetr, PetrWrap, Petya, or NotPetya). This malware masquerades as typical ransomware: it encrypts the data on the computer and demands $300 bitcoins for recovery. In fact, the malware authors’ intention was to cause damage, so they did all that they could to make data decryption very unlikely.

 

Another good write up by bleeping computer that contains more information.

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/news/security/ukrainian-police-seize-servers-from-where-notpetya-outbreak-first-spread/

Conspiracy theories

Last week, a blog post from a Ukrainian web developer went viral, after it hinted that the real culprit behind the hacked server could have been M.E.Doc’s web host, Wnet, a company that has been accused of having ties to Russia’s intelligence service (FSB).

An investigation into the man’s accusations revealed that the SBU had raided the web host on June 1, for “illegal traffic routing to Crimea in favor of Russian special services.”

 

View of someone who was impacted by Petya

http://colsec.blogspot.de/2017/06/petya-outbreak-june-27th.html

 

My machine –

Domain joined Windows 10 Enterprise 64bit running McAfee AV + Encrypted HDD. Fully patched with June’s updates and manually disabled/removed SMBv1.

Hit at 12:40 UK time with a BSoD. Reboot “Please install operating system – no boot device”.

 

And the follow up

http://colsec.blogspot.de/2017/06/petyaa-infection-summary-of-events.html

 

I’ll just put this up here to summarise what happened and how.

We assume 1 PC was infected, that machine provided the virus with some credentials. Could have been a workstation admin’s account, giving the virus admin rights to all PCs in the local area. Over time, it must have picked up Domain Admin rights as it spread, then hitting Domain Controllers and all other Windows servers with it’s PSEXEC/WMIC code. The rest is history. We lost PCs that were encrypted with McAfee Disk Encryption due to corrupted MBR, PCs that were not encrypted with McAfee showed the ransom message.

 

This is a good demonstration of making sure everything is 100% patched and not nearly patched.  It is difficult to keep older machines patched and updated in an enterprise environment, however when these systems are designed and implemented, we should be thinking and taking into consideration how we are going to update them and keep them secure, otherwise we will have to deal with the events described above, again and again.

Google Capture the Flag 2017

Google has announced its capture the flag for 2017.  Offering rewards for the winners and also participation if you are creative with your write up for the challenges you complete, so this should give many more individuals a chance of getting something for their effort, other than the enjoyment of course.

Qualification starts on the 17th of June, whereas if you can score enough points you can be invited to the final which will be held at google where you are then competing in another exercise in order to be declared the winner.

 

Why do we host these competitions?

There are three main reasons why we host these competitions.

First, as we’ve seen with our Vulnerability Reward Program, the security community’s efforts help us better protect Google users, and the web as a whole. We’d like to give the people who solve a single challenge or two in a very clever way a chance to teach us and the security community, even if they don’t qualify for the finals. We also think that these challenges allows us to share with the world the types of problems our security team works on every day.

 

https://security.googleblog.com/2017/06/announcing-google-capture-flag-2017.html

 

I do like these type of events as you get to see how creative people can be with problem solving, and usually many things we can learn from others as a result.

 

Patriotic Hackers

In what is somewhat of a mildly amusing statement, and I am sure not all of the conversation.  Suggests that its down to patriotic  individuals acting on behalf of themselves when they feel there are negative comments made about Russia.

It’s an interesting take on the subject.

https://www.rferl.org/a/russia-putin-patriotic-hackers-target-critics-not-state/28522639.html

 

Responding to a question about concerns in Germany that Russian hackers could meddle in that country’s upcoming federal elections, Putin said it was “theoretically possible” that “patriotic” hackers could attack those who “speak negatively about Russia.”

“At a government level, we are never engaged in this. That’s the most important thing,” Putin said at the televised meeting, which was held during Russia’s annual St. Petersburg International Economic Forum. He added that hackers could come “from any country in the world.”

 

Shadow Brokers Response Team – Retracted

As per my previous update, the idea behind what they wanted to do was a good one, but legally not so much.  Seems as humans we just cannot get around doing the right thing and being proactive.  We only understand how to react to when things go wrong.

Shadow Brokers Response Team

https://steemit.com/shadowbrokers/@theshadowbrokers/theshadowbrokers-monthly-dump-service-june-2017

 

Q: What is going to be in the next dump?

TheShadowBrokers is not deciding yet. Something of value to someone. See theshadowbrokers’ previous posts. The time for “I’ll show you mine if you show me yours first” is being over. Peoples is seeing what happenings when theshadowbrokers is showing theshadowbrokers’ first. This is being wrong question. Question to be asking “Can my organization afford not to be first to get access to theshadowbrokers dumps?”

 

So the Shadowbrokers will be releasing more allegedly NSA tools this coming month, as referenced in this story – http://bgr.com/2017/05/30/shadow-brokers-nsa-exploits-subscription/.

They are asking for Zcash to be used to purchase access to these latest exploits, which is around the $20k or so.  Now based on what happened in early May with Wannacry and the impact we saw in the UK, this is a concern for us all.  It did not take long from the initial release for someone to take advantage of these tools and weaponize them that had a large scale impact.  The positive side of this, is that now I believe many companies have had a wake up call and have learnt some lessons with regards to patching their systems and paying attention to when the security guy’s tell them to keep software and operating systems updated.

So now we have a couple of weeks until more tools are going to be released, I’m a bit indifferent if I agree with the current thinking of paying to get access to these tools.  This is a sound idea.  Get access to the exploits, research and work with vendors for them to be fixed, that is very commendable.  However it does open up a whole host of ethics and are we essentially going to be held to ransom everytime this happens in the future?  I’m not quite sure if this is the right approach.  With that said, there is the link below to the patreon page, that has more information and you can donate to the cause if you wish.

https://www.patreon.com/shadowbrokers_crisis_team

 

The group calling itself the Shadow Brokers have released several caches of exploits to date. These caches and releases have had a detrimental outcome on the Internet at large, one leak especially resulted in the now in-famous WannaCry ransomware worm – others have been used by criminal crackers to illegally access infrastructure. Many have been analysing the data to determine its authenticity and impact on infrastructure, as a community it has been expressed that the harm caused by exploits could have been mitigated against had the Shadow Brokers been paid for their disclosures.

 

This is an interesting read, that alludes to that the NSA did inform microsoft once the EnternalBlue software was stolen from the NSA.

 

The consequences of the NSA’s decision to keep the flaw secret, combined with its failure to keep the tool secure, became clear Friday when reports began spreading of a massive cyberattack in which the WannaCry software encrypted data on hundreds of thousands of computers and demanded a ransom to decrypt it.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/business/technology/nsa-officials-worried-about-the-day-its-potent-hacking-tool-would-get-loose-then-it-did/2017/05/16/50670b16-3978-11e7-a058-ddbb23c75d82_story.html?utm_term=.762b4cedfb72

 

 

UIWIX Ransomware

It was just a matter of time until other organisations or individuals followed the path set by WannaCry last weekend.

Seems there is another variant of ransomware doing the rounds which is exploiting the same loop hole as WannaCry is using port 445 to enumerate and infect other machines on your internal and then external networks.  It is exploiting the same SMB vulnerability (MS17-010).

Mitigation – Just need to  make sure you have the latest updates from microsoft.

If you see traffic to these domains, its likely not good!

aa1[.]super5566[.]com
07[.]super5566[.]com
a1[.]super5566[.]com
www[.]super5566[.]com
08[.]super5566[.]com

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/c72ba80934dc955fa3e4b0894a5330714dd72c2cd4f7ff6988560fc04d2e6494?environmentId=100

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/c72ba80934dc955fa3e4b0894a5330714dd72c2cd4f7ff6988560fc04d2e6494?environmentId=100

SMB Vulnerability MS17-010 NSE – Script to detect MS17-010 (WannaCry Ransomware)

This is taken from the nmap seclist page.  A script for nmap has been written that should allow you to scan your network to determine if its vulnerable.  It may not be perfect but I am sure it will help someone out there.

http://seclists.org/nmap-dev/2017/q2/79
Hey list,

I need some help testing the script smb-vuln-ms17-010. I tested it on a vulnerable win7 machine and it works as 
expected but I suspect there might be some issues with newer Windows versions and certain smb configurations (v2 
authentication protocols with signing enabled).

Don't forget to send me packet captures if you run into servers that are incorrectly marked as not vulnerable. 

Cheers!

smb-vuln-ms17-010: https://github.com/cldrn/nmap-nse-scripts/blob/master/scripts/smb-vuln-ms17-010.nse 
description = [[
Attempts to detect if a Microsoft SMBv1 server is vulnerable to a remote code
 execution vulnerability (ms2017-010).

The script connects to the $IPC tree, executes a transaction on FID 0 and
 checks if the error "STATUS_INSUFF_SERVER_RESOURCES" is returned to
 determine if the target is not patched against CVE2017-010.

Tested on a vulnerable Windows 7. We might have some issues with v2 protocols with
 signing enabled.

References:
* https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/security/ms17-010.aspx
* https://blogs.technet.microsoft.com/msrc/2017/05/12/customer-guidance-for-wannacrypt-attacks/
* https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee441489.aspx
* https://github.com/rapid7/metasploit-framework/blob/master/modules/auxiliary/scanner/smb/smb_ms17_010.rb 
]]



Paulino Calderon Pale || @calderpwn on Twitter || http://www.calderonpale.com