WannaCrypt Ransomware Part 2

It seems the initial wave has been stopped by Researchers, and then we had another one as detailed in the link below.

https://blog.comae.io/wannacry-new-variants-detected-b8908fefea7e

More good information and I suggest reading through it all if you have not done so already.  This is a bad weekend for business and infrastructure that is using older systems, but its been a good weekend for the infosec community in coming together and helping and sharing alot of good information with each other.

 

There is a tool you can run on a host that will stop the ransomware from encrypting your machine, however it will still attempt to spread over your network.

Download Here

 

 

wcrypt activity map

 

WannaCrypt Ransomware

In what has been big news over the past 24 hours.  Especially here in the UK is that the NHS has been hit with a large ransomware attack.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-39901382

http://blog.talosintelligence.com/2017/05/wannacry.html?m=1

This is a pretty good write up of what was known at the time.

There have been easy fixes for this available for the past 2 months and it was just a matter of time until the tools that were developed by our American Friends, that they would be used against the general public.

Hopefully this is lessons learned for many organisations, and they realise that patching and running fairly up to date operating systems is important and not just something to achieve compliance.

Few more articles that contain good information about these events.

https://www.troyhunt.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-wannacrypt-ransomware/

https://www.malwaretech.com/2017/05/how-to-accidentally-stop-a-global-cyber-attacks.html

 

Also of note.

wannadecrypt

 

If you use intitle:”index of” “@WanaDecryptor@.exe” as a search on google, at the time of this update there are 67 results.

Not a good weekend for the world of IT admins.

The github link referenced below is being kept up today and contains some very good and useful information.

 

 

Infected Webpage

hxxp://petroffpianostudio[.]com/ (This may now be cleaned up at the time of posting)

It looks like the the aforementioned webpage is infected with a redirect to download suspect files

Traffic observed after the infection suggests that it will attempt to download executable files from a few different locations.

hxxp://talk-of-the-tyne.co.uk/download1264/
hxxp://willy.pro.br/download3299/
hxxp://freight.eu.com/download3696/

The analysis of the files on hybrid analysis does confirm that these are malicious files

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/e8d2f149de58eb45b398a84d6d27d568ab1d239584edcb55531fe11da2f9c51b?environmentId=100

Once the executable file is on the host machine, it then attempts to call out to the following

173.230.137.155
206.214.220.79

Upon further analysis we have another file which has been downloaded from the following location

hxxp://matchpointpro.com/lDu52756eeJMW/

https://www.virustotal.com/en/file/4b97fa91d9f33392fde84a2af3500a78621a71b80b3d3486a7b70cdd47187ce3/analysis/1492020556/

https://www.hybrid-analysis.com/sample/4b97fa91d9f33392fde84a2af3500a78621a71b80b3d3486a7b70cdd47187ce3?environmentId=100

I revisited the links later in the day and have a bit more details, we can see they are still serving executable files. Chrome is now blocking and suggesting these files are malicious, and also so is internet explorer. I have not tried them on firefox at this time.

GET /download3299/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/x-ms-application, image/jpeg, application/xaml+xml, image/gif, image/pjpeg, application/x-ms-xbap, */*
Accept-Language: en-gb
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: willy.pro.br
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:16:51 GMT
Content-Type: application/octet-stream
Connection: keep-alive
Keep-Alive: timeout=15
Server: Apache
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="6274.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary


GET /download1264/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: application/x-ms-application, image/jpeg, application/xaml+xml, image/gif, image/pjpeg, application/x-ms-xbap, */*
Accept-Language: en-GB
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 8.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
Host: talk-of-the-tyne.co.uk
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:16:09 GMT
Server: Apache
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="5198.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary
Vary: User-Agent
X-Powered-By: PleskLin
MS-Author-Via: DAV
Keep-Alive: timeout=15, max=100
Connection: Keep-Alive
Content-Type: application/octet-stream


GET /lDu52756eeJMW/ HTTP/1.1
Accept: */*
Accept-Encoding: gzip, deflate
User-Agent: Mozilla/4.0 (compatible; MSIE 7.0; Windows NT 6.1; WOW64; Trident/4.0; SLCC2; .NET CLR 2.0.50727; .NET CLR 3.5.30729; .NET CLR 3.0.30729; Media Center PC 6.0; InfoPath.3)
Host: matchpointpro.com
Cache-Control: max-age=259200
Connection: keep-alive

HTTP/1.1 200 OK
Server: nginx
Date: Wed, 12 Apr 2017 18:11:09 GMT
Content-Type: application/octet-stream
Connection: keep-alive
Keep-Alive: timeout=15
Cache-Control: no-cache, no-store, max-age=0, must-revalidate
Expires: Tue, 08 Jan 1935 00:00:00 GMT
Pragma: no-cache
Content-Disposition: attachment; filename="5345.exe"
Content-Transfer-Encoding: binary
ngpass_ngall: 1

 

Still in the process of building my Analysis Lab, so this is not quite how I would like to post, but some information is better than none.

Decimal IP Campaign

Saw this article today and its quite interesting.

Websites compromised in ‘Decimal IP’ campaign

A quick search of the string “1760468715” shows there are quite a few websites that have been compromised.

This is quite a clever but old technique that is referred to as Dotless IP’s.  A google search will find quite a few results, with several posts from around 15 or so years ago.

In order to work out the IP address the value represents you can perform a fairly straight forward calculation.

If you had the IP address 172.16.4.8

You can calculate this as follows

172 * 16777216 = 2885681152
16 * 65536 = 1048576
4 * 256 = 1024
8 * 1 = 8

Add the bold figures up.

2886730760

So if you were to enter this address in your browser http://2886730760

It would attempt to take you to 172.16.4.8

Just another way of hiding in plain sight.